Best Dives in the Caribbean: Top Ten in 2021

18 March 2021
The Caribbean Sea stretches from the Gulf of Mexico and Cuba in the north down to south America. The water is warm and mainly calm. With wrecks, coral reefs, caves, walls and sharks - there are some fantastic dive sites. Here are ten of the best, as voted for by divers.

Tell us about your top Caribbean dives

Know better Caribbean dives? Cast your vote here.


1. Great Blue Hole, Belize

Belize's Blue Hole is around 300 meters (1,000 feet) across and 125 meters (400 feet) deep. This vertical cave contains remnants from its days above water - stalactites are preserved underwater. It is believed to be the world's largest feature of its kind. Inhabited by sharks with great visibility and cross from salt to fresh water at around 15 m. With beautiful rock formations, the hole drops down 148 m. Compare prices of Belize diving trips.

Diving the Great Blue Hole, Belize
The Blue Hole, Belize

Read more about diving Belize and the Blue Hole

2. Bloody Bay Wall, Little Cayman

Part of a Marine Park with strict conservation laws, Bloody Bay Wall is full of colour from sponges, sea fans and coral. Fantastic visibility, hoards of sharks and rays, dramatic vertical drop off stretching down hundreds of feet. Compare prices of Cayman Island diving trips

sponge and wall

Read more about diving Bloody Bay Wall

3. Palancanar Bricks, Cozumel, Mexico

Coral pinnacles rise from a slope between a sandy area and a drop-off. Swim-throughs and tunnels. Generally good visibility and gentle currents for drift diving. Nurse sharks, turtles, eagle rays, stingrays, lobsters, crabs… Palancar Bricks got its name from the bricks that were dropped here by a capsized barge in the 1950s.

Splendid Toadfish
Cozumel's Splendid Toadfish, Sanopus splendidus, Photo credit: Anita Floyd.

Read more about diving Cozumel

4. Dos Ojos (Los Cenotes), Playa del Carmen, Mexico

The Cenotes of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula feature fresh water above salt water: a fresh and salt-water dive in one. The cenotes (or sinkholes) along the Caribbean coast connect with flooded cave systems like Sistema dos Ojos. The visibility can be fabulous with the sunlight shining down through the water. The light is enough to take your breath away.

Dos Ojos
Cenote Dos Ojos

Read more about the Cenotes

5. Scotts Head Pinnacle, Dominica

Pinnacle with swim throughs, fantastic corals, clouds of fish, breathtaking scenery and always a turtle.

Hawksbill turtle

Read more about diving Dominica and Scotts Head

6. Punta Sur / Devils Throat, Cozumel, Mexico

Deep 40m dive through coral caverns and a winding complex structure of the dive. Breaks through to an amazing wall dive coasting upwards through the amazing clear waters with lots of green turtles. Called the Devil's Throat because of a narrow swim-through. A narrow tunnel takes you down at a 45o angle. Once outside, another entrance leads to a chamber known as little Cathedral, which is a large cave opening with giant sponges where light passes through.

Diver cave entrance
Photo by Clark Anderson/Aquaimages, CC-by-2.0

Read more about diving Cozumel and the Devil's Throat

7. Half Moon Wall, Belize

Full of life, Half Moon Wall is punctuated by tunnels between the gorgeous colourful sponges and sea fans. Unbelievable visibility and you might see eagle rays, reef sharks and turtles. Compare prices of Belize diving trips.

Eagle ray
Eagle ray and diver

Read more about diving Half Moon Wall

8. Hilma Hooker, Bonaire

Lies on the sandy bottom of a beautifully reefed slope, near Kralendijk. Big wreck with sponges, pristine coral, terrific sea fans and loads of fish. A dive with something for everyone.

In 1984 customs officials discovered almost 12 tons of marijuana on the Hilma Hooker. The captain and crew were arrested and the ship moored at the pier. However, she was in a very poor state of repair and the authorities were worried that she might sink, causing a shipping hazard. Dive operators started campaigning for the ship to be scuttled to attract dive tourism. The ship was moved to between two reefs, over 30 m of water. Whether by design or accidently, she began to list and a few days later sank.


by actor212 (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Read more about diving the Hilma Hooker

9. The Rhone, British Virgin Islands

The Rhone is blanketed in color from coral and sponges. You almost always see turtles and barracuda and it's teeming with fish: sergeant majors, angelfish, parrotfish, durgon. But it's a popular dive site for other reasons as well. It is the wreck of a 310 foot steamer that went down in a hurricane in 1867. She's in two sections. The bow is about 150 feet long and at about 70-80 feet of water. You can see the bowsprit, foremast with crow's nest, a cannon. Stern is in 30 feet with a huge propeller

Read more about diving The Rhone

10. Tiger Beach, The Bahamas

The place to go to photograph tiger sharks. And not just tiger sharks but lemon, caribbean, nurse and sometimes hammerhead sharks. The tiger sharks are at this shallow dive site year round, and dives can be long.

Tiger shark at Tiger Beach, Bahamas
by Marion Kraschl, (CC BY 3.0)

Read more about diving Tiger Beach

Other Dives?

Other dives to look at in the Caribbean include Bookends in Speyside, Tobago. Not enough divers know about this to vote for it, but it features a thrilling drift dive through mini canyons.

Want to know more? Discover the world's top 10 dive sites, best wreck dives and the top dives in Europe.

Vote for Your Top Dives

Dive Site 1:

Dive 1 Description:

Dive Site 2:

Dive 2 Description:

Other Comments or Runner-Up Dives:





How are the votes counted?
The first criteria is number of votes (weighted to favour the first choice dive site above the second). Where two dives tie for a position, priority is given to those with the most enticing descriptions and those whose area has several votes for different dives.



SCUBA News (ISSN 1476-8011)

Every month we send out a free newsletter featuring the best diving areas, underwater life, diving book reviews and interviews with authors. To receive this please fill in your e-mail address below. For an archive of previous issues see the SCUBA News page.